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chfa downpayment assistance

CHFA Loans – Connecticut Housing Finance Authority Mortgage Assistance

CHFA Mortgage Assistance for Connecticut Home Buyers

The Connecticut Housing Finance Authority, or CHFA, provides mortgage assistance programs to homebuyers in Connecticut. To receive CHFA mortgage assistance, you must be a first-time homebuyer or buying a home in a revitalization zone and qualify for CHFA assistance based on income. CHFA offers both low interest rate loans as well as downpayment assistance.

CHFA mortgages can be used to purchase single family homes, condos, multi-family homes, and even some mobile homes.

The current CHFA interest rate is 3.5% for government insured mortgage loans and 3.75% for non-insured mortgage loans.

CHFA First-Time Homebuyer Mortgages

Under the CHFA, first-time homebuyers and those who have not owned a home in over three years qualify for the First-Time Homeowner program. The Buyer, or borrower, must also mee

There are also income limits as well as property value limits for CHFA mortgages. The Buyer, or borrower, must make less than a certain amount, which is $87,800 for a home of 1 to 2 people, and $100,970 for a home of three or more people. There are also some income limit differences depending on the town you are looking to purchase in. The property value limits also vary by town. The income and property value limits for specific towns are listed here: CHFA Income & Value Limits by Town.

CHFA Down Payment Assistance

As a separate service from its low interest mortgage loans for low-income households, CHFA also offers downpayment and closing cost assistance. Down Payment Assistance is offered to borrowers who can afford to pay both loans but lack the savings to make the downpayment (less than $10,000.00 total household savings).

The minimum for Down Payment Assistance loan amount is $3,000, with the maximum being the minimum downpayment amount for the actual CHFA mortgage. In most cases, the Down Payment Assistance interest rate will match the CHFA mortgage interest rate, but it can vary and could be up to 6%.

CHFA Revitalization Zones

CHFA also offers mortgage assistance for homebuyers looking to purchase homes in certain areas marked for revitalization. These are areas where the Federal Government has determined would benefit from and increase in home ownership.

In the CHFA Revitalization Zones, the first-time homebuyer requirement is suspended, 1/4% reduction in CHFA published interest rate, income limits do not apply unless also seeking downpayment assistance, and mortgage insurance may be suspended.

In Connecticut, these revitalization areas include Ansonia, Bridgeport, Danbury, Derby, East Hartford, Groton, Hartford, Manchester, Mansfield, Meriden, Middletown, New Britain, New Haven, New London, Norwalk, Norwich, Stamford, Torrington, Windham and Waterbury.


The Lender you choose can give you more information about the details, costs, benefits and downsides of a CHFA mortgage. Click for a List of Participating CHFA Lenders

maximum fha loan amount

Federal Housing Finance Agency “FHFA” Raises FHA Loan Limits for 2017 – First Increase Since 2006

FHFA Announces Increase in Maximum Loan Amounts for Conforming “FHA” Mortgages

There is some good news for those people looking to buy a home in 2017. The Federal Housing Finance Agency, or FHFA, has announced that for the first time since 2006, they will be raising the maximum conforming loan limits for FHA mortgages.

FHA mortgages, for those that may not be aware, are those that are insured by the Federal government. FHA mortgage loans are popular because they allow prospective home buyers to put as little as 3.5% down to buy.

How is the FHA Maximum Mortgage Loan Limit Calculated?

The baseline loan limit for FHA mortgages was set back in 2008 through the Housing and Economic Recovery Act (HERA). HERA sets the baseline FHA mortgage loan limit at $417,000 with a yearly review and adjustment based on the average home price nationally. However, we all know that home prices vary greatly across the country. Therefore, the FHA raises mortgage loan limits in high-cost areas; where the median (or mid point) of home values is greater than 115% of the baseline loan amount. The maximum increase in high-cost areas is to 150% of the baseline.

What are the 2017 FHA Mortgage Loan Limits?

The FHFA Housing Price Index for the third quarter of 2016 increased for the first time since the third quarter of 2007, on which the HERA baseline was calculated. The increase in the Housing Price Index between the two periods was about 1.7%. Therefore, the baseline FHA loan amount for conforming mortgages is being increased from $417,000 to $424,100. The maximum FHA mortgage loan amount is further increased to up to $636,150 for high-cost areas.

Fairfield County, Connecticut is considered to be a high-cost area under the FHA guidelines. The Maximum FHA mortgage loan amount for Fairfield County is $601,450. This is just $34,700 less than the FHA absolutely maximum allowable mortgage loan amount for the highest cost areas in the country.

Why Buy With An FHA Loan?

A stated above, FHA mortgage loans are popular because they allow the Buyer to put less than 20% down, often as low as 3.5%. Additional benefits are refinancing without appraisals and FHA mortgages being assumable by future Buyers.

However, FHA loans require mortgage insurance premiums (MIP) for any loans with less than 20% down. There is both an “up front” fee that is paid at closing as well as monthly payments. MIP is an additional expense that home buyers should consider when deciding between FHA and other loan types.

 

 

What is the Connecticut Real Estate Conveyance Tax?

What is a real estate conveyance tax?

A real estate conveyance tax is a tax paid by the “Transferor” in a real estate transaction, typically this is a Seller. However, there are some clever Sellers that put the burden of paying the conveyance tax on the Buyer in the real estate purchase and sale contract. The conveyance tax is paid BOTH to the State of Connecticut as well as to the municipality in which the property is located. The real estate conveyance tax MUST be paid to the Town Clerk (note: not the tax collector) at the time that the Deed transferring title is recorded on the land records. You must also present a completed  and signed OP-236 – Connecticut Real Estate Conveyance Tax Return. A fillable online version is available here.

How much is the real estate conveyance tax in Connecticut?

The amount of the conveyance tax is dependent on the value of the real estate property being conveyed. In Connecticut, the real estate conveyance tax is .0075 of every dollar to the State (thts 3/4 of 1%) and .0050 of every dollar to the local municipality (that’s 1/2 of 1%).

If a home sells for $200,000.00, the Seller will have to pay $1,500.00 to the State of Connecticut, and $1,000.00 to the Town.

Are there any exceptions to the Connecticut Real Estate Conveyance Tax?

There are 22 exceptions that are noted on the back of the instructions to the return. The most commonly used are conveyances between spouses, conveyance due to foreclosure, and conveyance for little or no consideration.

What is the CFPB Closing Disclosure Addendum to Real Estate Purchase & Sale Contract

What is the CFPB Addendum and Why is it Necessary?

The CFPB Closing Disclosure addendum is a document that is often attached to standard form real estate purchase and sales contracts after October 1, 2015. It became necessary because the CFPB, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, passed TRID, TILA RESPA Integrated Disclosures, a law that changed the settlement practices for real estate purchases and sales.

The purpose of the CFPB Addendum is to set forth the respective responsibilities of Buyer and Seller, and to specify the consequences of failure to comply.

How does the CFPB Addendum modify the Real Estate Purchase and Sale Agreement?

Due to the strict requirements of TRID, lenders for Buyers have strict time line requirements. Since they have to have the Closing Disclosure acknowledged by the Buyer at least 3 business days before closing, most Lenders are requesting final figures from all parties 10 days and sometimes even 14 days before closing.

The CFPB Addendum contains terms that:

  1. Make parties aware that CFPB regulations of the Lender may cause delays ;
  2. Make parties aware that any delay in getting the Lender figures may result in financial hardship for the other party, and lists the information that must provided to the Lender;
  3. Waive any “time is of the essence” requirements in the contract;
  4. Seller to provide figures 10 days before closing or waive their right to collect the adjustments;
  5. Address discrepancies in real estate adjustment figures;
  6. Seller agrees to meet Buyer requirements for any discovered condition issues during walk through;
  7. Waive any Seller damages that may result from Closing Disclosure acknowledgement delays.

It should be noted that the CFPB Addendum is heavily in favor of the Buyer and drafted against the Seller. It protects the Buyer from Seller delays and Protects the Buyer from Lender delays, however, it places the burden of Buyer or Lender delays on the Seller without compensation.

ct real estate title law

2016 Connecticut Law Changes How A Trust Handles Real Estate

Trusts and Real Estate Conveyance

Trusts can be used for a variety of purposes in estate and wealth planning. A common use for a Trust is to hold real estate property. Whether holding the real estate is the sole purpose of the Trust, or just one of the assets with which the Trust is funded, the real estate must be conveyed into the Trust, and one day the property may be sold and will need to be conveyed out of the Trust to a Buyer.

The Current Law for Conveying Real Estate into a Trust

Currently, the law regulating transfers of real estate property into a Trust holds that a Deed conveying real estate to a Trust directly does not convey good title because a Trust does not have the capacity to hold title to land. In order to properly convey title the Deed must name the Trustee of the Trust as the “Grantee”, or individual receiving the property. The idea here being that the Trustee is holding and caring for the property on behalf of the Trust.

If the property is in fact conveyed to a Trust directly, it is not validated until 2 years have passed without issue.

When it came time to transfer the property out of the Trust, once again the Trustee would be needed, but it is in fact the Trustee who is holding the property.

New Law Takes Effect October 1, 2016

Coming into effect this October is Public Act 16-194 which changes the procedure for transferring real estate property into a Trust. The Act reads:

“Any conveyance of an interest in land to a trust rather than the trustee or trustees of the trust shall constitute a valid and enforceable transfer of that interest. Any conveyance by the trust, which conveyance is signed by a duly authorized trustee of such trust, shall be treated as if the conveyance was made by the trustee.”

The new law should resolve any confusion or problem when transferring property into or out of a trust by allowing the trust, and therefore any trustee, to convey the real estate.