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land record documents

Validation of Defective Documents Recorded on the Land Records

Can Land Records Documents be Valid if Defective?

The land records of a town or county contain the relevant documents in regards to land ownership in the that location. Whenever buying or selling property, a title search must be performed to make sure the seller is giving the buyer clean title. Sometimes during these searches, attorneys come across documents that are defective, or missing something require by Connecticut law to make that document effective. One of the common areas where we have seen this is when individual attempt to create or manage their on trusts, but it happens in other situations as well.

The good news is, Connecticut General Statute 47-36aa can validate certain defects in recorded documents, as long as those documents were recorded 2 or more years earlier and have not yet been challenged in court.

What Kind of Defective Documents Can Be Validated?

CGS 47-36aa, known as the Validating Act, can cure defects in a multitude of common land records documents. The documents which can be validated if defective include:

  • Deeds
  • Mortgages
  • Powers of Attorney
  • Releases
  • Notices of Lease
  • other documents affecting real estate

What Kind of Document Defects Can Be Cured?

When searching land records, it is not simply enough that the document is there. Documents must be drafted in a specific manner, contain specific information, must be executed via specific procedures and be recorded in a specific manner; all of which is regulated by Connecticut law. While it is impossible to go over every type of defect that can occur in land record documents, here are the types of defects that can be cured by the Validating Act:

  • defective or non-existent acknowledgement (the person signing the document did it wrong or forgot to do it)
  • lack of a witness or witnesses
  • missing, incorrect or conflicting dates
  • where a business or trust entity is the grantor, but an individual signs the document in their individual capacity
  • where a business or trust entity is the grantor, but an individual signs without disclosing their authority to sign
  • a document signed under a power of attorney, but signed without referencing the power
  • if a document is signed under a power of attorney which is effective but not recorded until after
  • a document transferring property to a recipient who does not have the legal capacity to hold interest in real estate

What Kind of Defects CAN NOT be Cured?

The validating act does not cure any and all defects in documents that have been recorded yet unchallenged for 2 or more years. The following defects are NOT cured by the Validating Act and therefore make their documents invalid:

  • errors in or missing property description
  • errors in the names of relevant parties
  • Incorrect references in deeds, mortgages and releases (to other land record documents)
  • documents not signed by the original signature of the grantor
  • unrecorded or missing documents
  • defects in foreclosure proceedings
  • gaps in chain of title

How Do You Stop Defective Documents from Being Validated?

If you want to make sure that a defective land records document is not cured and validated, you must challenge the document by bringing a court action and recording a lis pendens within 2 years of the document being recorded.

real estate closing attorney danbury ct

Do I Need a Real Estate Closing Attorney to Sell My Home?

Selling a Home in CT? You Need a Real Estate Closing Attorney

If you are looking to sell your home, you may or may not want to hire a real estate agent, but you will definitely want to hire a real estate closing attorney. While the marketing of your home to potential buyers is something you might be able to handle yourself, the services of a seller’s real estate closing attorney are essential to a legally compliant real estate sale.

What does a seller’s real estate closing attorney do?

A seller’s real estate closing attorney provides many services to the Seller that legally legitimize the sale and make it binding, while at the same time protecting the liability and financial interests of their client. A seller’s real estate closing attorney performs the following closing tasks:

  • Reviews Exclusive Right to Sell Agreement and Dual Representation Waiver with real estate agent/broker (if hired early enough);
  • Reviews and assists with Listing and Mandatory Disclosures (once again, if hired early enough);
  • Negotiates with buyer’s attorney and drafts Purchase and Sale Contract;
  • Works to resolve any inspection, appraisal or title issues to meet buyer’s needs;
  • Prepares closing documents such as power of attorney, Deed and affidavits;
  • Obtains payoff statements for outstanding liens or mortgages;
  • Attends the closing with, or on behalf of, the client;
  • Handles cash flow in escrow, receiving purchase funds and making any payments or disbursements; and
  • Secures and records releases for mortgages after closing.

When issues arise in real estate deals it is the attorneys that defuse situations and save deals by coming up with solutions that are acceptable to both parties. A seller’s real estate closing attorney can save a seller of real estate property a lot of stress and worry.


 

If you are looking to sell a house or condo in Connecticut, let us handle your real estate closing matters. We charge flat rate fees on closings, and we offer FREE phone consultations, so you can make sure we are the right attorney for you.

SCHEDULE A CALL WITH OUR REAL ESTATE ATTORNEY

Short Sale Debt Forgiveness Tax Relief

Tax Relief for Short Sale Debt Forgiveness

Short Sale Tax Relief

Exemption for Tax Liability Created by Short Sale Debt Forgiveness

The Budget Bill signed into law by President Obama on December 18th, 2015, has received a lot of coverage in the news for many reasons. One of the good thing hidden in the Bill is that The Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act, which had expired in 2014, has been retroactively extended through 2016. Let’s take a look at why further relief is necessary when debt is forgiven through short sale.

Debt Forgiveness is a Taxable Event

In this world, very few people are strangers to debt. Whether it is unsecured debt such as credit cards or student loans, or secured debt such as a mortgage on real estate property or car loan, almost everybody owes somebody else money. However, lenders do not always successfully collect debts owed to them. In these cases, the lender may elect to cancel all or part of the debt of the borrower.

With unsecured debt, the lender might not be able to collect the debt or may simply give up on trying to collect. With secured debt, the lender will usually chose to foreclose or repossess the property, or allow a short sale as discussed below.

What many people do not know, is that the forgiveness, discharge or cancellation of debt (whichever term you chose to use), is generally a taxable event. The IRS expects people to pay taxes on the difference between the amount they owed and the amount they actually paid. How does the IRS know? Because the lender is required by Federal Law to file Form 1099-C “Cancellation of Debt”, for any debt forgiveness greater than $600. the 1099-C contains pertinent information such as the borrower and lender identification, amount of debt forgiven and date of discharge. you are then required to show the amount of forgiven debt as income on Form 982 and submitted with your Form 1040 “Income Tax Return”.

How Does Debt Forgiveness Tax Impact Short Sale?

In a Short Sale, the lender allows the property owner and borrower to sell the property for less than they owe, and forgive the remainder of the debt, in an attempt to save themselves the time and cost of foreclosure and property maintenance. Technically, this debt forgiveness would be a taxable event as discussed above.

However, The Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act shields homeowners from tax liabilities created by mortgage debt that is forgiven due to Short Sale of a principal residence (as well as debt forgiven through mortgage modification or deed in lieu of foreclosure). Up to $2,000,000 of forgiven debt is eligible for tax exclusion.

Is Tax Relief for Short Sale Debt Forgiveness Fair?

Whether the forgiveness is fair or not is up for debate, but it definitely makes sense. People seeking Short Sale to avoid foreclosure do not have the money to pay their mortgage. How can the IRS expect the borrower to pay taxes on money they couldn’t pay? With the great number of financially distressed properties in this housing bubble, they can’t.

Consult a Professional

You need to make sure you are making use of the right professionals so that you do not pay the price at a later date. Your account should be consulted whenever a large scale taxable event occurs; such as the forgiveness of thousands of dollars or more in debt. They will need this information to accurately file your tax return. Your real estate attorney needs to make sure that the lender provides you with a 1099-C that is complete and accurate. Finally, you need to make sure that your team is communicating and exchanging information efficiently.

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